The Most Common Nutritious Berries—Vitamins, Minerals, Phytonutrients Comparison

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Infographic - the health benefits of berries - a fascinating nutritional comparison of strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries and cranberries

 

Use this infographic on your own blog!

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5 Most Common Berries: A Vitamin and Mineral Comparison

The infographic compares the vitamins and minerals content of the 5 most readily available berries in supermarkets: strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries and cranberries.

So you can see at a glance, for example, which type of berry contains the most folate, as well as the main health benefits of folate.

It also lists the main health benefits of each vitamin/mineral, and the main phytonutrients found in berries.

Below is a textual summary of the infographic.

 

VITAMIN A Content in Berries

Vitamin A helps promote good eyesight; aids healthy bone growth; helps maintain a healthy immune system; repairs damaged cells and strengthens the reproductive system.

Blackberries have the highest vitamin A content. Here is a breakdown of vitamin A (International Units per 100g of berry):

  • Strawberries: 12 IU
  • Raspberries: 40.6 IU
  • Blackberries: 214 IU
  • Blueberries: 54 IU
  • Cranberries: 66 IU

 

VITAMIN B9 (FOLATE) Content in Berries

Vitamin B9 repairs damaged DNA; promotes a healthy fetal development; promotes sperm health; strengthens the heart; helps maintain a healthy colon; prevents blood disorders.

Strawberries, raspberries and blackberries all have a similar high amount of folate. Approximately 4 times more folate than blueberry. Cranberry has by far the lowest B9. Here is a breakdown of vitamin B9 content in each berry (mcg per 100g of berry):

  • Strawberries: 24 mcg
  • Raspberries: 25.8 mcg
  • Blackberries: 25 mcg
  • Blueberries: 6 mcg
  • Cranberries: 1.1 mcg

Related reading: How to make a folate-rich juice.

 

VITAMIN C Content in Berries

Vitamin C is a powerful anti-cancer nutrient; boosts the immune system; reduces hypertension; helps maintain good eyesight; fights free radicals so acting as an anti-aging agent; combats internal bleeding; speeds up the bodies healing process.

Strawberries have the highest vitamin C content, followed by raspberries in a distant second place. Blackberries are third, then cranberries and blueberries. However, all of these common berries can be considered rich in vit C for our health! Here is the breakdown of vitamin C content in each berry (mg per 100g of berry):

  • Strawberries: 58.8 mg
  • Raspberries: 32.2 mg
  • Blackberries: 21 mg
  • Blueberries: 9.7 mg
  • Cranberries: 14.6 mg

Related reading: How to use high dosage vitamin C to fight cancer.

Common berries

VITAMIN E Content in Berries

Vitamin E repairs damaged skin; acts as an anti-aging; reduces inflammation; strengthens hair and nails; helps maintain a healthy balance of hormones; promotes brain health.

Cranberries have the highest vitamin E content, closely followed by blackberries and then raspberries. Blueberries and strawberries have significantly less vitamin E (though still handy amounts). Here is the breakdown of vitamin E content in each berry (mg per 100g of berry):

  • Strawberries: 0.3 mg
  • Raspberries: 1.1 mg
  • Blackberries: 1.2 mg
  • Blueberries: 0.6 mg
  • Cranberries: 1.3 mg

Related reading:  How best benefit from Vitamin E with the right fats.

 

VITAMIN K Content in Berries

Vitamin K aids blood clotting; is an anti-cancer; strengthens the bones; improves insulin sensitivity; reduces bruising.

Blackberries and blueberries both have very highest vitamin K content. Raspberries are well back in third place with about half the vitamin K content, followed by cranberries and strawberries. Here is the breakdown of vitamin K content in each berry (mg per 100g of berry):

  • Strawberries: 2.2 mg
  • Raspberries: 9.6 mg
  • Blackberries: 19.8 mg
  • Blueberries: 19.3 mg
  • Cranberries: 5.6 mg

Related reading: All you need to know about vitamin K, the blood-clotting vitamin.

 

IRON Content in Berries

Iron is responsible for healthy blood building; muscle-building; improves mental performance; regulates body temperature; boosts energy levels; strengthens the immune system.

Raspberries are the richest in iron, followed by blackberries then strawberries. Blueberries and cranberries have slightly less iron. Here is the breakdown of the iron content in each berry (mg per 100g of berry):

  • Strawberries: 0.4 mg
  • Raspberries: 0.8 mg
  • Blackberries: 0.6 mg
  • Blueberries: 0.3 mg
  • Cranberries: 0.3 mg

Related reading: 3 Juice recipes to make for blood-building and to treat anemia.

 

POTASSIUM Content in Berries

Potassium is blood-alkalizing; prevents muscle cramps; regulates blood pressure; promotes brain health; speeds up metabolism; reduces anxiety and stress. 

Blackberries (highest content), strawberries and raspberries all have very high potassium content. Cranberries and blueberries have about half the amount, though can still be considered good sources of potassium. Here is the breakdown of the potassium content in each berry (mg per 100g of berry):

  • Strawberries: 153 mg
  • Raspberries: 151 mg
  • Blackberries: 162 mg
  • Blueberries: 77 mg
  • Cranberries: 85 mg

Related reading: How to make a potassium-rich juice to prevent night-time leg cramp.

 

MAGNESIUM Content in Berries

Well-known for preventing cramps, magnesium also relieves migraines/headaches; relaxes muscles and nerves; is an anti-inflammatory; treats insomnia; and improves heart health.

Raspberries is the most magnesium-rich berry, followed by blackberries, strawberries, cranberries and finally blueberries. Here is the breakdown of the magnesium in each berry (mg per 100g of berry):

  • Strawberries: 13 mg
  • Raspberries: 27.1 mg
  • Blackberries: 20 mg
  • Blueberries: 6 mg
  • Cranberries: 6.6 mg

Related reading: Eat magnesium-rich foods to reduce inflammation, hypertension and fatigue.

 

Common Phytonutrients In Berries

Here are some of the common but powerful phytonutrients that can be found in abundance in these berries and their respective health benefits:

Anthocyanins

  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Lowers the risk of certain cancers
  • Helps maintain a clean, healthy urinary
  • Improves memory
  • Helps maintain a healthy eyesight

Quercetin

  • Anti-aging
  • Fights free radicals
  • Protects against cancer
  • Healthier heart

Rutin

  • Promotes vascular health
  • Slows tumor growth
  • Anti-allergens
  • Anti-inflammatory

Resveratrol

  • Fights cancer
  • Lowers blood sugar levels
  • Protects brain health
  • Reduces inflammation

 

So … Which is the Healthiest and Most Nutritious Berry?

The blackberry and raspberry come more consistently at the top in our infographic. However, this should be taken lightly and with a number of caveats.

The best berry for your health at any given time may vary depending on your current state of health, your symptoms and what else you have in your diet.

Bear in mind that there are many more vitamins and minerals essential for your health than those listed, but we couldn’t possibly cover them all in one infographic 🙂

Berries are an excellent source of vitamins and nutrients. We advise regular consumption of fresh berries as part of a balanced diet full of other fresh fruits and vegetables.

There are many other delicious types of berry, including mulberry (rich in vitamin K, potassium and phosphorous), goji berry (rich in amino acids), aronia (considered one of the most antioxidant-rich foods on earth), acai (high antioxidant activities) and red currants (vitamin C).

 

Notes regarding this infographic:

  • Actual nutrient content in food will vary depending on a great many factors, but principally: where it was grown, the climate, the season, actual species, watering and soil type. This Juicing-for-Health infographic is provided to give an accurate approximation of the nutritional value of each berry compared to others.
  • For each nutrient, the bars are drawn to scale and show the amount of the nutrient contained in each berry to proportion compared to the amount in the other berries.
  • The charts have been normalized across vitamin groups. So for example you cannot compare vitamin C content with vitamin E, as they are not on the same scale.
  • Data source: US Department of Agriculture.

 

Like this? Please share and tag a friend!

I hope you enjoyed this infographic and find it as useful a reference as I do. Please share and tag a friend whom you think will appreciate the info.

 

How to add this infographic on your own blog

Please feel free to share this infographic. You can use this infographic on your own website or blog. You just need to copy the code below and paste it onto your page. The only condition is that you leave the code as is, with the credit to Juicing for Health.

Some of the links I post on this site are affiliate links. If you go through them to make a purchase, I will earn a small commission (at no additional cost to you). However, note that I’m recommending these products because of their quality and that I have good experience using them, not because of the commission to be made.

About Sara Ding

Sara Ding is the founder of Juicing-for-Health.com. She is a certified Wellness Health Coach, Nutritional Consultant and a Detox Specialist. She helps busy men and women identify their health issues at the root cause, in order to eliminate the problems for optimum physical/mental health and wellbeing.

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